What kind of Password Protector are you? Take the quiz to find out!

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It’s no secret that people’s password habits are concerning. We recently published research results that found more than half of people store their passwords in a spreadsheet and over 25% still write passwords down on paper or sticky notes! Considering these passwords contain valuable personal information like bank statements, credit card information, financial info, and much more, it’s alarming that individuals are so haphazard with their passwords.

To help you get a pulse on your own password habits, we’ve created a new password quiz to see if you’re doing a good job protecting your data, or if you need to spruce up your habits. So far, we’re impressed with the results. Just over half of people earned the most secure status from the quiz, “Password Secret Service,” which means they’re generating diverse, unique passwords, storing them securely, and more. For the other 50% that could do some housekeeping on their password habits, here are 3 easy tips to help you protect valuable personal information and be a better password protector:

  • Don’t use the same password for too long: Many websites don’t have strict password requirements, meaning you could easily create an account, which includes your credit card info, with some of the weakest, worst passwords. Stronger passwords can be achieved simply by adding numbers, letters, and symbols. Make these changes and create unique passwords across every account, app, and device. This is the only way to keep your data secure.
  • Stop relying on memory: The root of the issue is often the number of accounts and passwords people are being asked to create, and then manage in order to carry out simple day-to-day activities. The easiest way to keep track of all of these unique accounts (and strong passwords) is to use a password manager. This will ease the burden of password management and encourage strong passwords that don’t have to be committed to memory.
  • Share accounts, not passwords: There are certainly circumstances where individuals need to be able to share passwords with one another. Passwords are often shared through insecure channels such as email and instant messaging. Password managers, like Meldium, are designed for business and team use – encourage proper password hygiene and allow access to the specific account or application without bothering with passwords. These tools add convenience and an extra layer of security.

If you haven’t already, take the Password Quiz to get see you how you stack up against others. If you need to up the ante on your security, follow these 3 easy steps to keep your accounts, passwords, and personal information safe.

    
Katie Petrillo

Written by

Marketing Programs Manager of LogMeIn Access