Top-Rated IT Management Apps for Remote Asset Monitoring

The workforce has changed, and having the ability to work from anywhere has become the new norm. However, this increase in flexibility has led to an increase in theft or loss of IT assets, so ensuring IT professionals stay ahead of these threats is more important than ever before.

GetApp, a Gartner company,  put together the top-rated IT management apps for remote asset monitoring that allows IT professionals to stay ahead of these threats and have more control over their technology assets.

According to user reviews, LogMeIn Central was rated 4.5 out of 5.0, followed by ConnectWise Automate (4.2) and Kaseya VSA (4.0). Pulseway was rated 4.8, and Jamf Pro was rated 4.7 out of 5.0.

Utilizing IT management tools ensures IT professionals keep their companies and employees operational and secure. These solutions offer remote monitoring and control capabilities to help IT professionals track, manage, and protect all technology assets – from anywhere.

LogMeIn Central users particularly liked the following:

  • Reviewers are happy with the wide array of customization options and features provided by LogMeIn Central.
  • Users say that LogMeIn Central’s mobile access capabilities are reliable and make it easy to connect.
  • According to users, LogMeIn Central offers reliable features and is easy-to-use, even if you have to manage 200+ systems remotely.

Explore the article to view what users liked and disliked about each solution here: https://lab.getapp.com/best-it-management-apps-for-remote-monitoring/

 

         

PHISHING ALERT: FAKE EMAILS MIMIC LOGMEIN AUDIT NOTIFICATION

Update 12.14.18:

We have received additional reports of similar emails being sent to LogMeIn customers from new malicious domains. We want to make it clear that these did NOT come from LogMeIn and people should NOT click on the links in these emails. Please be sure to delete this message if you receive it.

While we are working with our partners to get these sites taken down, we want you to be aware of the specific phishing email below. As always, if you have clicked a link in this email, we recommend changing your password and enabling two-factor authentication on your account as well as your users’ accounts.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

We are getting reports from LogMeIn customers about suspicious emails that are designed to look like they are coming from LogMeIn — they have all the hallmarks of a phishing attempt.

These fake emails are meant to look like a LogMeIn email. The email subject line is: “LogMeIn Audit Notification – Update”

We want to make it clear that these did NOT come from LogMeIn and people should NOT click on the links in these emails.

While we have worked with our partners and successfully removed these malicious websites, as part of our commitment to security, we still want to make sure our users and the public are aware of this specific email and provide an easy way for people to identify the tell-tale signs of phishing attacks.

Email subject line: LogMeIn Audit Notification – Update
Intended behavior/action: Tries to get you to click a link to enter your LogMeIn login credentials.
Email body text is:

As with all suspicious emails, please read carefully and review the website links in these messages.

Please be sure to delete this message if you receive it. If you have clicked a link in this email, we recommend changing your password and enabling two-factor authentication on your account as well as your users’ accounts.

We also recommend taking a look at our primer on how to protect yourself against phishing attacks and ensure you’re following secure password practices.

         

IDC Reports: Endpoint Management Challenges Posed by Today’s Cyberthreats

The cyber-security landscape is ever evolving, and IT professionals must remain up-to-date with the current state of IT infrastructure to proactively protect themselves from threats.

To learn more about the current state of IT infrastructure, we reached out to an IDC Analyst, Phil Hochmuth, and asked him to evaluate 5 key questions related to effectively managing one’s IT infrastructure in today’s security landscape.

Download this report to learn: 

  • What are the key trends around endpoint management and the latest cyberattack methods? 
  • How are IT teams set up to handle sophisticated attacks?   
  • What are the biggest mistakes internal IT organizations can make in terms of endpoint management? 
  • What is the cost of making mistakes around endpoint management?    
  • What are the mission-critical capabilities that organizations should look for when evaluating an endpoint management solution?  

Download the report here.

 

 

         

Evaluating Endpoint Management Solutions? This Buyer’s Guide Can Help

We know IT teams wear a lot of hats and that there are numerous solutions available to enhance endpoint infrastructure security and increase productivity. Researching and selecting the right endpoint management solution can be overwhelming, so we’ve put together a practical guide for the time and resource-constrained IT professional to facilitate the search.

Download this guide to uncover:

  • The critical need for comprehensive endpoint management
  • 10 key questions to shape your search
  • Must-have features and capabilities
  • The value your solution should deliver
  • How LogMeIn Central can help

Download Here

         

Uncovering the Harsh Realities of Endpoint Management

The workplace is evolving, and cybersecurity concerns and the risk of security breaches are higher than ever. According to the Ponemon Institute, 54% of companies experienced one or more successful attacks that compromised data and/or IT infrastructure in 2018, proving that the majority of today’s organizations are struggling to secure their endpoints. For many, endpoint security risk has become unmanageable, and companies are paying a prohibitive cost for each successful attack – $5 million for a large organization or an average of $301 per employee.

From the biggest ransomware attack in history (WannaCry) to two security vulnerabilities that put nearly all operating systems and computers at risk (Spectre and Meltdown), IT professionals are on high alert to improve their security measures, but many are struggling to determine how to implement proactive measures to manage and protect all endpoints from cyber-attacks.

In our latest research study, we surveyed 1,000 IT professionals across North America and Europe about the security landscape and uncovered market trends and business threats driving the need to make endpoint management a top priority. We revealed current tactics and proactive measures IT professionals can take to better protect their organizations from breaches.

To learn more, check out the infographic below, and download the full report here:

 

         

The Surprising State of IT Security: 4 Key Trends Revealed

Whether it’s malware or hackers or viruses, they pose significant threats to businesses and companies around the world, and rightfully so. These continue to evolve – and get smarter – making risk management a consuming task for IT teams and MSPs. According to the AV Test Institute, there were over 700 million known malware instances in 2017 and that number continues to rise year over year. What’s even scarier is how commonplace breaches and attacks are – almost 60% of IT teams have experienced a breach or attack at some point.

But rather than becoming more skilled at handling these threats, IT teams are more challenged by them now than ever before. And there are plenty of reasons for that. With the proliferation of devices such as laptops, smartphones, tablets, and the rise of account-based information that lives in the cloud, employees and companies are more at risk than ever, and IT teams are scrambling to keep up with rapidly-changing tech behaviors.

In our research study, we heard from 500 IT professionals on everything related to anti-virus and security management – their current processes, challenges, and overall take on the overwhelming task of protecting their computers and customers from threats. Check out the infographic below to learn the 4 trends we uncovered in the current state of IT security.

LogMeIn_State_of_IT_Final_standard_res

         

Don’t Leave Your Endpoint
Protection to Chance

News coverage of recent cybersecurity attacks shines a glaring spotlight on the vulnerability of our endpoint infrastructure in this increasingly technology-dependent world.

Exploits in the News

When the WannaCry ransomware infected more than 300,000 computers in over 74 countries in May 2017, it forced the UK National Health Service to turn patients away, resulted in a two-day shut down of LG self-service kiosks in South Korea, affected more than 40,000 businesses in China and threatened thousands of individual systems.

According to a New York Times article, the hackers behind the attack leveraged a hacking tool they stole from the National Security Association (N.S.A.) called “Eternal Blue.” Eternal Blue enabled the rapid spread of WannaCry by exploiting a vulnerability in Microsoft Windows servers. Even though Microsoft had addressed the vulnerability via a patch in a March software update, large volumes of computers weren’t up-to-date to defend against this attack.

The incident was quickly followed up by other global ransomware attacks including Petya ransomware initiated in June, and the series of Equifax data breaches which started in May and were discovered in July before being reported to the public 6 weeks later. The Equifax breaches, like the WannaCry attack, were enacted by exploiting a software vulnerability that the firm attempted to patch months prior to the attack.

Costs of Exploits

Incidents like these are more common than you might think. According to a study conducted by Ponemon Institute and sponsored by IBM security, the probability of experiencing a data breach is 1 in 4 and costs around $141 per record on average. If your company or the clients you serve have as few as 20k records, that’s equivalent to $2.8 million dollars at risk.

Proactive Prevention

Protecting systems from costly exploits, like just the few we mentioned, falls on IT. It’s imperative to have a centralized approach to maintaining machines and keeping them up-to-date with the latest software patches that are vital to protecting your overall network. Automating updates and patch deployment will ensure that your systems aren’t left unprotected and can save hours of time over updating each endpoint manually.

If you’re not managing or automating this critical function yet, try LogMeIn’s Central Premier for free for 14 days or request a demo from one of our Central pros. Make security your #1 priority and protect your endpoints today!

         

New LogMeIn Pro Status Page Now Live

 

Busy professionals rely on LogMeIn Pro to securely remote into their computers and get their work done from anywhere. Because reliable connectivity is a crucial aspect of remote access, we’ve built LogMeIn Pro with security being the most important design objective. Today, as a further commitment to our customers, we announce the launch of a new status page to keep you fully informed of our service status and historical up-time.

Visit http://status.logmeinaccess.com/ to view our status page that shows the current state of the LogMeIn Pro service. Powered by Atlassian’s monitoring  service https://www.statuspage.io/ our administrators and users have access to the #1 status and incident communication tool.

We’re committed to keeping your connections completely secure and reliable, and we’ll always keep you fully informed regarding any product incidents and updates. For real-time updates, be sure to subscribe to receive notifications via email, text or phone.

         

PHISHING ALERT: PoS Malware Mimics LogMeIn Software Updates

As part of our ongoing commitment to security, we want to make our users and the public aware of a new report of malicious software impersonating LogMeIn updates to Point of Sales (PoS) systems.

On Friday, January 19, 2018, a security researcher from Forcepoint (https://www.forcepoint.com/) reached out to LogMeIn’s Security Team and provided details on a suspected PoS-based malware. According to our investigation, the malware is intended to deceive an unsuspecting user into executing a malicious email, link or file, possibly containing the LogMeIn name.

This link, file or executable is not provided by LogMeIn and updates for LogMeIn products, including patches, updates, etc., will always be delivered securely in-product. You will never be contacted by us with a request to update your software that also includes either an attachment or a link to a new version or update.

This potential malware is being delivered through channels independent of our solutions and we have no evidence at this time to believe that the LogMeIn environment or our products have been compromised as a result thereof.

As always, we encourage users follow standard best practices to safeguard their accounts against phishing and social engineering which include:

  • Only accept updates directly from within your LogMeIn product. We will never deploy a software update via email.
  • Beware of phishing attacks. Do not click on links from people you don’t know or that seem out of character from your trusted contacts and companies.
  • Turn on 2FA for email, and other services like your bank, Twitter, Facebook, etc. Two-factor authentication remains one of the most effective ways to protect your account from targeted attacks.
  • Set a strong, random password for email and for every online account.

As with all suspicious emails, please read carefully and review the website links in these messages. Please be sure to delete these messages if you receive them.

         

What We Know About The Latest CPU Bugs Meltdown and Spectre and Steps You Can Take to Protect Your Organization

On Wednesday, January 3rd, two CPU bugs were discovered that could impact billions of devices worldwide. These two security flaws, known as Meltdown and Spectre, target most computer processing systems making it possible for attackers to steal sensitive data – including passwords, banking information, and encrypted communications.

Meltdown and Spectre: What Are These New Security Flaws?

Let’s start with Meltdown. Affecting Intel processors, Meltdown enables attackers to bypass the hardware barrier between applications that are being run and the computer’s memory – allowing for them to read a computer’s memory and steal passwords.

Spectre, on the other hand, breaks the isolation between different applications allowing attackers to essentially trick those applications into giving up valuable information. Spectre’s impact is larger given it affects Intel, AMD, and ARM processors. This expands its reach to include a multitude of devices, essentially anything with a chip in it.

Combined, these two bugs affect virtually every modern computer, including laptops, smartphones, tablets, and PCs from all vendors, running almost any operating system.

What steps can be taken to reduce the risk of being exposed to these two bugs?

Three steps your organization can take to reduce the risk of being impacted by these two security flaws are to patch your systems with the latest update, monitor CPU usage, and continue to keep an eye on this evolving threat.

  • Patch Your Systems

Patch Management is an essential part of securing your IT infrastructure. Meltdown and Spectre can impact devices running just about any operating system – including Windows, Mac, and Linux – or application leaving just about every organization at risk. Intel and ARM have issued patches that they deem will make your systems immune to these two bugs – but this requires users to download a patch and update their operating system to fix. If you have not already applied the necessary patches, make sure to do so as soon as possible.

  • Monitor CPU Usage

Because these two bugs target CPUs, be sure to continuously monitor CPU usage on all machines in your ecosystem. If you notice any unusual activity, be sure to raise a red flag to your IT leadership and explore the situation further.

  • Keep An Eye On This Evolving Threat

It has only been a few days since these security flaws were identified. More information is sure to surface over the coming days and weeks – including critical information from the security researchers who identified these flaws as well as the impacted providers Intel, AMD, and ARM.